MMBA, A Specialized MBA for the Media Industry

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A career in Media and Entertainment is indeed very promising. Want to know why?

  • Over the next five years, the industry is poised to grow at an average annual growth rate of 11-12%​
  • By 2022, total employment across the industry is expected to be 6-6.5 million from the estimated 3.5-4 million in 2017.

With ​myriad emerging options​ and career tracks​ to choose from; like ​Over The Top (OTT), ​Print Media,​ Out of Home (OOH), Animation, VFX, Film Business, Music Industry, TV Broadcasting,​ Publishing, Online Media and other electronic media – the Media ​+​ ​Entertainment domain is a multitude of opportunities for professionals ​and potential aspirants.

What some of the industry professionals have to say about how a specialized MBA in Media and Entertainment, makes all the difference!

Shobu Yarlagadda, Producer of Bahubali:
The industry is evolving rapidly, the way we produce films and the way we manage and market films is changing very fast. And there is a need for people with good management skills, good strategy and good communication skills. Students with an MMBA background will be an ideal choice for a production office like ours.

Akkineni Nagarjuna, Film star:
Entertainment business management in India has been unorganized for the most part. As the business is growing more and more diverse; studios, production companies and media companies are experiencing a serious skill gap. This results in the increase in demand for trained professionals. To meet this demand, a MMBA program, a unique inter-disciplinary program, spanning across both business and media is the solution. MMBA graduates master the conventional business subjects as well as media and entertainment subjects, a winning combo, which makes them, survive and succeed in the fast growing media industry.

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Jeffery Hardy, Founder of Film Profit, Hollywood:
I think business side of the business is obviously what I focus my life on. The business side of business is what makes everything run well. You can’t just think about only the creative side. You have to do good production, you have to have them well managed, you have to do good distribution, you have to look for every opportunity in the market place, you have to manage it well, manage relationships with distributors, exhibitors, with everyone.

More people need to focus on it because we need people who can run good productions, who can run good distribution companies and really understand this business, not just from a creative point-of-view or personal desire point-of-view, but from a business point-of-view; only they will make the business work well.

Kandaswamy Bharathan, Producer of Roja:
The Indian film, media and entertainment industry has witnessed remarkable transformation in the last 5 years. This industry has been growing at a compound annual growth rate of 12% per annum as compared to India’s national GDP growth of about 7.5 % per annum. What this means is that there is a huge demand for trained creative technical and management professionals in this fast growing industry.

Smitha Sasidaran, Programming Head, Fever 94.3 FM:
The entertainment industry is really vast, be it radio, music, film, fine arts; so I think there is a great opportunity for everyone in this field. To sell creativity, now you have convergents of different media. Selling creativity is the biggest challenge and if it is academically taught, then the industry is more than happy to welcome them.

Understanding who are your stakeholders and consumers is very important; if you don’t understand that, then you are missing out on many opportunities. So, a specialized academic program is definitely helpful.

Kishore Kedari, Business Development, International Distribution, Arka Media Works:
MBA schools prepare the students in understanding the business, process as well as the organization structure of the industry. We need a specialization to an extent where we are offering courses exclusive to each and every aspect of film production. MMBA is not only going to give a broader prospective of the production, but also the business aspects related to the media and entertainment.

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Top Reasons to Apply:

  • Pursue a unique course that will fast-track you into the film, TV and other emerging+allied creative industries.
  • Practice and undertake production inside a Live studio environment in the heart of Hyderabad.
  • Produce a ‘Graduate Film’ and gain complete work experience (internship project) at a major media firm.
  • Study the course that is designed and delivered by top industry experts from Indian and global industries.
  • Participate in a series of Film Markets, Film Festivals, Industry Conferences, Master Classes and Guest Lectures.
  • ​Partner with business leaders, experts and entrepreneurs providing an endless pool of potential associates/producers and employers.
  • Profit from the MoU between AISFM & JNTU-Hyderabad, a first of its kind University and Industry Collaborative Program, leading to our certified professional post-graduate degree, MMBA.

Want to know more about our unique MMBA course in detail, watch our MMBA FB Panel Discussion: https://goo.gl/pUQrhc

Want a quick overview of what MMBA is, watch this MMBA Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfmbBWQyLbY

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Brief Profile of the author: MNVVK Chaitanya
In his current role, MNVVK Chaitanya provisions academic advisory by means of curriculum design, development and delivery for the MMBA course. In addition to undertaking teaching, industry interface and project supervision; all aimed at creating an India based research plus teaching agenda in media & entertainment business and management areas.
In the immediate past, at KSK Energy Group, he conceptualized and implemented twenty different OD, talent management, leadership, employee engagement and policy designinterventions. ​

Source Credits: According to the report published by the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) titled ‘Media & Entertainment: The Nucleus of India’s Creative Economy—Unleashing the Talent Tsunami to Drive Growth.’

Children explore AISFM & Annapurna Studios!

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AISFM has opened doors for outreach programs in a big way. Starting with the recent International Teacher Training Workshop for the local schools, Annapurna Studios & AISFM are playing an active role in the local culture & education system, bridging the gap between the society & film industry. AISFM & Annapurna Studios was vibrant with little voices and smiles of excitement as 40 children from across India visited their premises on a day-long trip.

AISFM took this initiative being an Academic Partner in the International Children’s Film Festival of India (ICFFI) 2017, organised by Children’s Film Society of India (CFSI) and the Telangana Government. As a partner of this film festival, popularly known as, ‘The Golden Elephant’, Annapurna International School of Film and Media (AISFM), hosted dinners for delegates, CFSI board meetings, and sent their experts as panel members to support the festival.

The cheerful little students came from various places, including Jammu & Kashmir, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Goa etc.

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Then it was time for a quick, short and crisp learning session for the students. Divided into two groups, one group learnt about the finer nuances of animation and the other group learnt the art of acting. The Animation Group had a small six-scene storyboard to follow, wherein the children created live models of each scene in the story with play dough which was then shot on a camera; when replayed was a mini-animation movie in itself! The Acting Group learnt what goes on behind the camera in acting and how to act and express oneself.

While all the children unanimously said that they loved the whole experience, they all wished to have a full fledged longer workshop.

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Mohd. Nadeem, a Grade 9 student from Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalaya, Kupwara, Jammu & Kashmir, who was attending the film festival and coming to Hyderabad for the first time, loved the ambience and said “the ambience, cleanliness, people and facilities are very nice and I loved the movies shown too.” J Abhilash, Grade 9 student from Government School, Narsampet said, “I want to learn acting and know more. This workshop was very nice and it will help me in concentrating too.” Aivya, Grade 8th student from Ryewood International School, Lonavala found the workshop very interactive and interesting and Kabir from Sharda Mandir, Goa felt that the workshop was an eye-opener into the field of film and media.

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G Venkateshwarlu, teacher from Government School, Narsampet, lauded the AISFM facilities and said, “The workshop was really nice and was a way of expression for the students; more such workshops should happen.” R Saraswati, teacher from ZPHS, Hayathnagar said “the children’s wish is not fulfilled in one day; they want to join it and want to come back for more.” Shweta Pardesai from Ryewood International School, Lonavala said “both the workshops were very good and they will really help the children in eye-hand coordination, concentration and in studies. What I really liked was that all the children in each workshop were given an opportunity to showcase their talent.” Veena Kumari, teacher from Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalaya, Kupwara, Jammu & Kashmir said, “It has been a great experience for the children to see the studios, campus and workshop and also the movies at the festival; and we would definitely want to come again.”

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Children need to understand the value of visual media and film and that it is a very powerful medium which should be included in all curriculums. This event was very helpful for the students to learn more and gave them great exposure and a concrete idea on how things work in the film industry, be it animation, lights, sounds, music etc., according to the need of the movie. These skills are something that the children can use in their classrooms too.

Annapurna Studios and AISFM are proud to be a part of the CFSI activities and glad to open its arms wide for the imaginative young audiences & future citizens of India.

How journalists use social media: A statistical look

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7 tips for budding mobile journalists

 

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Traditional journalism, long form writing and in-depth, is still the pinnacle of writing and reporting. But with the emergence of new media, news rooms across the world are experiencing a revolution like never before.

Today, one does not have to wait for the morning newspaper or switch on their TV to get their dose of news. Electronic devices like the iPad, laptop and even mobile phones have become important tools for news consumption.

Over the past few years, mobile journalism has emerged as the fastest means of communication for journalists.

And we are not talking about the ‘sting operation’ footage that the AAP has been flooding
the media with recently. Nor are we speaking of other grainy mobile phone material that most
Indian news channels pass off as ‘reports’.

We are talking mobile phone-wielding journalists reporting from the streets of Syria;
about the BBC’s reports from Stockton-on-Tees, the area of massive flooding.

Some argue that it’s simply an extension of what journalists have always done – use tools and technology at hand to do their job. Mobile journalism, also referred to as MoJo, is a single platform production – breaking news captured, edited and submitted on the go.

It might seem like a daunting task to move from print and online to MoJo. But once familiar, you’ll realise its cheap, fast, efficient and extremely accessible.

Here’s a list of basic tips to help you with mobile journalism and make the most of the camera you already have in your pocket.

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First things first: Before tapping record on your phone, ensure your device is on airplane mode. This stops calls and app notifications coming through and interfering with your reporting, particularly if you’re live streaming.

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Clean your lens: Mobile video expert and former BBC video journalist Mark Egan recently spoke at a MoJo conference in Dublin where he covered the basic checks you need to make while MoJo reporting.

Cleaning the camera lens is definitely a top priority. It’s not something smartphone users tend to do often, but even a small speck of dust on your lens can compromise the shot. And in journalism, like Egan pointed out, evidence – clear evidence – is paramount.

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Shoot the right angles: Mobile journalism can come under severe criticism if not executed well. There is always doubt cast on the footage and questions raised on the authenticity. A good mobile journalist knows how to shoot from the correct angles. Always film horizontally unless you’re using an app that makes it impossible to do so.

With the right software on your mobile phone, you can shoot, add lower thirds, create voiceovers, and incorporate nice transitions and more, on the go.

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Don’t forget the writing: Most mobile journalists think that their job ends with recording and editing footage. Wrong. There is still writing involved. Ideally, one should prepare pictorial or written descriptions of how they intend to cover the story.

Like a list of people to interview, or establishing shots to take. You can write those elements down in boxes and create a basic shell of a story. You can later go back to the field and fill in the blanks or do it in the studio.

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Take care of storage: Mobile journalists are in the habit of dumping footage on their laptops. But experienced journalists will tell you that storage is “really important”.

They recommends a cloud storage solution, to store audio and video while in the field without having to worry about going back home to them on a desktop, plus an external hard drive. Also, there is less chances of losing important footage. You don’t want to be the one who “lost the exclusive”.

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While shooting on the streets: It’s imperative that once in the zone of reporting, the reporter moves close to where the action is happening. This helps record the footage better.

“Film a variety of shots and different angles,” advised RTE news journalist Patricia O’Callaghan, at the MoJo conference. “You can never have enough close-ups,” she said. “And [you should] film in sequences, which really help you to tell the story. Use the special touches that apps allow, such as time lapses or other features that will make your report look really special.”

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Research well: Before going to cover a story, it’s advised that the reporter does thorough research, especially if you are reporting from an area of strife. Use apps like twitter, google maps and four square, to track events, familiarize yourself with the area and “check in”, so people now your whereabouts.

This saves your time from wandering around aimlessly and protects you from potential dangers on the streets.

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